DIY Outdoor shower with hot water

I’ve been wanting an outdoor shower for years for many reasons.  The primary reason is that using the shower inside fills the house with humidity that is extremely unwanted in Texas in the summer.  Even the exhaust fan doesn’t help significantly.  An outdoor shower avoids all of that.

I finally decided to do something so I shopped around on the internet finding the cheapest one from Walmart.com for around $29.00.  I almost went with that but what’s the fun of buying one that’s already made.

Not sure exactly what I was going to do, I went to Home Depot and looked around at the parts.  I finally decided to go with a simple PVC pipe design.  I bought a single 3/4″ pipe and all the parts I would need including a $4.50 shower head.   I could have gotten a nicer one but this is a prototype that I wasn’t even sure about.  A cheap one is fine.  The whole thing cost me $24.00 after taxation.

The most complex part might be the bottom.  It needed to stand by itself so I used a T fitting as the base.  For a third foot, I used another T to come out the back and connect a faucet.  Any cheap faucet will do so it will connect to a hose.  Yes, it works in reverse but that’s fine.  Actually better if you think about which way the pressure goes.  I used a washing machine hose to go from the faucet to the garden hose.  I had it handy so it cost me nothing.

The top of the shower consists of a simple 90 degree bend, a 45 degree bend and a screw on adapter for the shower head to attach to.

After verifying everything fit together, I cemented it all together and waited for it to cure.

A cold shower may be fine for some people but warm is definitely better.  I like to take my showers in the evening so I am clean when I go to bed.  Not a big fan of sleeping in my own filth.

I connected the other end of the garden hose to the drain faucet on the water heater.  The hose runs through a hole in the garage where other pipes and wires pass through.

In the summer I keep my water heater set to a lower temperature.  A lot of heat is not required during the summer and it saves money on gas.

Before you do this, I must caution you that using the drain valve may cause it to leak since it has usually been sitting unused for many years.  Don’t worry too much though. You can buy a replacement valve at Home Depot if necessary.  This kind of connection is also not good for permanent use because the hose could burst and flood the house.  If things test out OK, you could replace the valve with a pipe to the exterior and put the valve outside.  I might do just that if the shower works out as a long term thing.  In the meantime, be sure to turn off the water at this valve when you are not using the shower to avoid unnecessary leaking.

So there you go.  The whole project took me around an hour or less.  Easy peasy and funly wunly!

 

 

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